John Wolff's Web Museum

The Burroughs Adding Machine Company


 

Contents

Burroughs adverising postcard, c.1918
Burroughs adverising postcard, c.1918

Overview

William Burroughs (1857-1898) built his first experimental model of an adding machine with printed output in 1884. He formed the American Arithmometer Company in St Louis in 1888, and commenced manufacture in 1892. The company he founded grew to become one of the best-known names in adding and accounting machines, but Burroughs died in 1898 without ever seeing the full success of his inventions. The company relocated to Detroit in 1904, and was renamed The Burroughs Adding Machine Company in 1905 in honour of its founder.

The high-keyboard adding and recording machines were the only Burroughs products designed by William Burroughs himself. Following his death in 1898, the product range was expanded by the acquisition of a number of potential competitors, including the Pike adding machine and the Moon-Hopkins billing machine. Other competitors, such as the Universal adding machine, were purchased and soon discontinued. A key-driven calculator was produced in 1911 to compete with the Felt & Tarrant Comptometer, and a 20-pound "portable" adding machine (the "P" series) appeared in 1925. "Portable" was relative to the high-keyboard machines, which weighed well over 100 pounds in some configurations. A range of ten-key adding and listing machines (the "J" series) was introduced in 1954.

The printing calculators grew into bookkeeping machines in the 1930s, automatic accounting machines during the 1940s and 50s, and then into electronics, computers, and aerospace systems through the 1960s and 70s. The company became the Burroughs Corporation in 1953, and merged with Sperry to form Unisys in 1986.

Burroughs had extensive overseas operations, and was exporting to 60 countries by the mid-1920s. Burroughs machines sold in Australia prior to the 1939-45 war were built in Detroit for the British currency system - pounds, shillings, pence, and sometimes farthings (quarter-pence). During the European reconstruction in the late 1940s Burroughs built a major new factory at Strathleven in Scotland, initially to assemble machines from US-made parts and later to manufacture the full product range for the British and Commonwealth markets. Most of the post-war Calculators and Portables found in Australia are from the Strathleven factory. The 10-key J-series machines were built in France, but did not sell in any quantity in Australia until the decimal currency conversion in 1966.


The Burroughs Adding Machine

Burroughs Model 9 Burroughs Adding Machine, Class 1, Model 9, S/N 9-137308
9 columns (10 digits), Sterling currency (with Farthings)
Dimensions: Body 9-1/2"W x 13"D x 13"H
Weight: 67 pounds
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, 1910

The external appearance of the classic Burroughs adding machine changed very little from 1892 into the 1920s. The distinguishing features are the high sloping keyboard, the bevelled glass front, and the printing mechanism out-of-sight at the rear of the machine. The glass front was a necessity, as the display register is actually inside the casing. Many machines had glass sides as well, to display the internal mechanism and the ornate cast-iron framework.

The illustration shows a manually-operated glass-sided machine for Sterling currency (with Farthings). The paper carriage takes rolls, sheets, or printed forms, and has an end-of-page indicator and bell. The carriage can be positioned manually to adjustable stops.

The machine performs addition only, with no provision for subtraction either directly or by addition of complements. There are two large keys on the left-hand side for totals and sub-totals, and three smaller keys for non-add, repeat, and error (or keyboard clear). The red buttons at the top of the machine act as zero keys to clear the individual keyboard columns.


Burroughs Model 2 on stand Burroughs Adding Machine, Class 1, Model 2, S/N 2-591672
9 columns (10 digits), Sterling currency, electric motor drive
Dimensions: Body 9-1/2"W x 13"D x 13"H, overall 20"W x 20"D x 36"H
Weight: 120 pounds
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, about 1919

This Model 2 adding machine was built in about 1919. The machine has nine columns for Sterling currency (without Farthings), and is fitted with a wide paper carriage and an electric motor drive. The machine is supported on a tubular steel frame with the motor and gearbox mounted underneath. The pillars on the left-hand side of the frame supported a writing table which is no longer present. The frame is fitted with four retractable castors to allow the 120-pound assembly to be moved with safety.



The Burroughs "Visible" Adding Machine

Burroughs Visible adding machine Burroughs Visible Adding Machine, Class 3, S/N 3-989895
7 columns, Sterling currency
Dimensions: 9-1/2"W x 19-1/2"D x 8"H
Weight: 40 pounds
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, about 1925

The Burroughs Class 3 machine is based on the mechanism designed by William H Pike Jr for the Pike Adding Machine Company. Pike appears to have worked previously for William Burroughs in St Louis, as his name appears as inventor on American Arithmometer patents from 1897. Pike left St Louis around 1901 and established his Pike Adding Machine Company in Orange, New Jersey. Production commenced in 1904, and was well established when the company was acquired by Burroughs in 1909. When Burroughs relocated the manufacturing operation to Detroit, the Pike factory in Orange was acquired by the newly-formed Monroe company.

The Pike machine was smaller, simpler, and cheaper than the Burroughs, but its biggest advantage was visible printing. The printed results were in full view of the operator, rather than hidden at the back of the machine. Burroughs continued to develop the machine into the 1920s, adding features such as two-colour and split printing, wide paper carriages, direct subtraction, and electric motor drive. The machine was sometimes known as the "flat-bed" after the long horizontal arrangement of the keyboard and the display register.

The example illustrated is a basic 7-column add-only machine for Sterling currency, with a fixed paper-roll printing mechanism.



The Burroughs Calculator

The "Burroughs Calculator" was a non-printing key-driven machine introduced in 1912 in response to the success of the Felt & Tarrant "Comptometer". It was sometimes known as the "Horton calculator" after its designer, Allen A. Horton. It was also widely known as the "Burroughs comptometer", in spite of Felt & Tarrant's strenuous efforts to protect their trademark.

The first Burroughs key-driven machine was very similar to the Comptometer in its external appearance, but was quite different in its internal mechanism, with the register and carry mechanism based on a complex system of planetary gears. It was only about two-thirds of the weight of the Felt & Tarrant machine, and had none of the safety features. In particular, there was no protection against incomplete keystrokes in either direction. The register would simply advance in proportion to the depth of stroke, with no indication of error. However, the price was also about two-thirds of the Comptometer, which made it quite a popular (if dangerous) machine.

Horton and his associate Walter J. Pasinski continued to develop the key-driven calculator over a long period. A machine with an electric motor drive was produced in 1928, and an electric machine with a grand-total register in 1933. The patent records suggest that Pasinski was still actively involved with the machine into the 1950s.

An excellent article contributed by a former Burroughs operator can be found on the Comptometer Operators pages.


Early 9-column Burroughs Calculator Burroughs Calculator, S/N 205077
9 columns (10 digits), Sterling currency
Dimensions: 9-1/4"W x 14-1/2"D x 6"H
Weight: 13-1/2 pounds
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, 1911-14

A very early 9-column Burroughs Calculator for Sterling currency, in a black pressed-metal case.

Although the case shows a remarkable similarity to the Felt & Tarrant Comptometer, the Burroughs keyboard differs in a number of areas. The ten-shillings column has a full row of "1" keys, while the 10 and 11 pence keys are shifted sideways into the farthings column. There is no key release button, as the machine does not have the mis-operation locking mechanism. There are no subtraction cutoff levers, so it is necessary for the operator to left-fill a complement entry with 9s. A small un-labelled key in the top left corner enters a 9 into the leftmost column.


Burroughs patent label This transfer on the rear panel of Burroughs Calculator No. 205077 shows the original US Patent dates in 1912. The corresponding patent numbers are 1016501 and 1023168, issued to Allen A Horton and Walter J Pasinski respectively. The Horton patent is for the machine as a whole, while Pasinski's covers improvements to the design of the tens-carry mechanism.


 

Early 13-column Burroughs Calculator Burroughs Calculator, S/N 209714
13 columns (14 digits), Sterling currency
Dimensions: 12"W x 14-1/2"D x 6"H
Weight: 18 pounds
Manufactured: Detroit, USA, 1911-14

This 13-column Burroughs Calculator was originally from the Post Office in Antwerp, a once-prosperous wheat-farming town in western Victoria. The Post Office (and most of the town) no longer exists. The green paint and the transfer on the front are from "Macdougalls Pty Ltd", who were once a major firm of stationers and office suppliers in the Australian capital cities.


Burroughs calculator, 13 columns Burroughs Calculator, Class 5, S/N E5-1118781
13 columns (14 digits), Sterling currency
Dimensions: 12"W x 11"D x 7"H
Weight: 15 pounds
Manufactured: Detroit, USA, 1915-

In spite of the differences in the keyboard and the internal mechanism, the obvious external similarity between the original Burroughs Calculator and the Comptometer inevitably led to litigation over patent infringements. After some adverse findings, the Burroughs machine was re-designed to become the Class 5 Calculator. The keyboard mechanism is about 3" shorter than previously, although the register mechanism is largely unchanged. The machine is housed in a rather elegant die-cast alloy casing. The legs at the rear raise the keyboard to an angle of about 15° and give the machine its distinctive "high-heeled" appearance.


Burroughs calculator, 13 columns, later model Burroughs Calculator, S/N A589671
13 columns (14 digits), Sterling currency, converted to decimal
Dimensions: 13-1/2"W x 12"D x 8"H
Weight: 17-1/2 pounds
Manufactured: Detroit, USA, 1930s

A later Burroughs Calculator for Sterling currency, in a more rounded pressed-metal housing. The mechanism is raised internally to bring the keyboard to a 20° angle.

When Australia changed from Sterling to decimal currency in 1966, this 13-column machine was "converted" very easily. The shillings and pence columns were simply ignored, and the keytops on the nine decimal columns were re-arranged into colour groupings for dollars and cents. (Compare this machine to the normal Sterling keyboard on the model below). The converted machine continued in service for another ten years.

When key-driven machines were finally retired in favour of electronic data processing systems in the 1970s, many of the young girls who had trained as operators in the 1940s and 50s found themselves and their machines "surplus to requirements". This well-used and well-kept machine was presented to its operator as a souvenir on her retirement. She was obviously quite attached to her former career, as she kept the machine with its dust cover, conversion tables, and her original training notebook for a further 20 years, only parting with them when moving house after her husband's death in 1999.


Burroughs calculator, 13 columns, electric Burroughs Calculator, Electric, S/N B44195
13 columns (14 digits), Sterling currency
Dimensions: 13-1/2"W x 12"D x 7-1/2"H
Weight: 26pounds
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, 1940s

A 13-column Burroughs Calculator for Sterling currency with an internal electric motor drive, built in the new (post-war) Burroughs factory in Scotland. Apart from the colour scheme, the case of this British-made machine is much the same as the manually-operated model above. The motor provides the energy to operate the mechanism, in a similar fashion to an electric typewriter, giving a very light touch to the keyboard and finally eliminating the risk of partial keystrokes. The drive mechanism was designed by Walter Pasinski in 1928, and received US Patent 1901794 in 1933.

This machine is fitted with subtraction buttons (in front of the rows of keys), and a clearing key that is marked (incorrectly) with a "+" sign. Otherwise, the operation is essentially the same as the manual models.


Burroughs Calculator, 9 columns, dual register. Burroughs Calculator, electric, dual register, S/N C 74328 S
9 columns (10 digits), decimal currency
Dimensions: 11"W x 14-1/2"D x 10"H
Weight: 27 pounds
Manufactured: Burroughs Machines Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, 1950s

A late-model Burroughs Calculator with an electric motor drive and a grand-total register at the rear. The machine has a pressed-metal base and a die-cast alloy cover.

The mechanism to drive the rear-mounted register was designed by Walter Pasinski in 1933 (US Patents 2240797/8). Rather than advancing both registers together, the machine accumulates a result on the front register alone. When this calculation is complete, the operator presses the Plus or Minus keys on the right-hand side to transfer the result either positively or negatively to the rear register.



The Burroughs "Portable" Adding Machine

The Burroughs "Portable" adding and listing machine was designed in the mid-1920s as a replacement for the high-keyboard machines. The mechanism is described in US Patent 1853050 (58 pages), filed by Allen A Horton in 1926. (Horton was also the primary designer of the Burroughs key-driven calculator from 1912).

The Portable mechanism is a very early example of modular design as applied to a calculating machine. Most prior machines (and a great many subsequent ones) were designed on the "monolithic" principle - they were assembled piece by piece "from the ground up", to perform a specific function. Horton's Portable was designed as a set of self-contained modules or functional blocks which could be quickly and easily assembled in various combinations to construct a range of machines with different characteristics.

The main module of the Portable contains just the basic operating and control mechanisms, the actuating racks and stop bars, and the type carriers. The accumulator and carry mechanisms are in a separate module which attaches to the rear of the main unit with 4 screws. Horton's original patent describes accumulator modules for addition only, for addition and subtraction, and for duplex addition on two independent accumulators. Modules with complementary (or "tumbler") accumulators, true negative totals, and several multi-accumulator arrangements for accounting machines were added later. None of the carry mechanisms require "blank strokes" at any stage of their operation. The keyboard is a self-contained module which can be attached and removed with just two screws, while the print hammers and the paper and ribbon systems are in three separate interchangeable modules at the upper rear of the machine. A power module containing a universal motor, gearbox, governor, and the complete electrical equipment can be attached with just 2 screws and 2 connecting links.

The Portable was a very popular machine, as the modular construction allowed it to be built (and re-built) in a huge range of combinations - 6, 8, or 10 columns; decimal, Sterling, or other non-decimal systems; add-only or direct subtraction, with or without true negative totals; paper rolls or several types of wide paper carriages; manual or electric operation; and so on. There were frequent minor changes to the mechanisms and the casings as development and manufacture continued well into the 1960s. The machines illustrated below are just a small sample of the possibilities, arranged roughly in chronological order.


Early Burroughs Portable Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, Class 8, S/N 8-1359565
8 columns, add only, manual, Sterling currency (with Farthings)
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 210H
Weight: 8.74kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, c.1930

An early Class 8 (addition-only) machine from around 1930, for Sterling currency with Farthings. The function keys in the rightmost column are Sub-Total, Total, Non-Add, Repeat, and Error (or keyboard clear). A small "Non-print" lever above the function keys disables the printing and paper feed mechanisms when a printed record is not required. Printing must, of course, be re-enabled to obtain the total, as the Portable has no direct register display. The machine has a flat-sided pressed-metal casing in gloss black, with the "Burroughs Portable" name in gold on the front. (Unfortunately, the machine illustrated also has a liberal coating of rust).

The internal view of an early add-only mechanism shows the keyboard stop bars, the actuating racks pivoted near the centre, and the type carriers above. The interchangeable rear section contains the accumulator gearset (just visible at the bottom front of the square cutout) and the tens-carry levers at the bottom rear. The accumulator moves forward and back to engage alternately with the racks and the carry mechanism. The forked lever extending from the top plate operates the paper and ribbon feed mechanisms, which are mounted on the outside of the casing. The Portable contains 8 large springs to power the return stroke, and a hydraulic damper to control the speed of operation. A worn damper can leak a lot of oil if the machine is stored or transported on its side.


Burroughs Portable, 10 columns, manual. Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, Class 8, S/N 8A-187302
10 columns, add only, manual, Sterling currency
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 210H
Weight: 9.12kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, 1930s-40s

A 10-column add-only machine for Sterling currency, without Farthings.

This later machine has a number of minor changes, including a longer operating handle, a cover over the paper feed pawls, and deletion of the Non-print lever. The main panels have been recessed slightly and overpainted with a satin finish so as to give an attractive framed appearance. The "Portable" has been deleted from the name on the front. Take care when cleaning these machines, as the finish on the recessed panels is badly affected by water.

The Sterling keyboard has an unusual arrangement in order to accommodate 10 columns in the same body as the 8-column machine above. The 10 and 11 pence keys have been moved to the top of the shillings column, while the 8 and 9 shillings have replaced two of the redundant 1 keys at the top of the ten-shillings column.


Early Burroughs Portable (subtractor) Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, Class 9, S/N 9A-209223
8 columns, add/subtract, manual, Sterling currency
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 230H
Weight: 9.44kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, c.1930

The Class 9 Portable from 1928 provides direct subtraction, but prints complements rather than true values for negative totals. The machine is switched manually between addition and subtraction by means of a bare metal lever protruding from the bottom right of the keyboard. A subtraction key was not introduced until the mid-1930s. The printing mechanism includes a back-rest to allow annotations to be written on the paper tape. The function keys are the same as on the machines above.


Burroughs Portable, electric Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N A-666699
8 columns, add/subtract, electric, Sterling currency
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 230H
Weight: 13.13kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, 1930s-40s

Although the internal electric drive mechanism was shown in Horton's 1926 patent, the motorised machines were not available commercially until about 1930. The drive mechanism is a self-contained unit mounted in the previously empty space on the left of the machine. It is controlled by an "Add bar" mounted through the top edge of the casing, to the right of the keyboard. In the mid-1930s the subtraction lever (shown on the machine above) was replaced with a "Subtract bar" on the electric machines, or an additional function key on the manual models. The Error key was moved to the bottom right of the keyboard. The Repeat key was sometimes coupled to the Add bar on the electric machines, and some later models had a separate Negative Repeat key next to the Subtract bar. Some electric models could also be operated manually by fitting a modified operating handle through the small hinged cover on the right-hand side.

This 8-column motor-driven adder and subtractor for Sterling currency was built in Detroit in 1947 (dated on the motor supression capacitor). The mechanism uses a "tumbler" or complementary accumulator for subtraction, but does not provide true negative totals. The paper and ribbon modules have been updated to provide easier loading.

The internal view (taken from the rear of the machine) shows the large universal motor coupled to a cast aluminium reduction gearbox, with the centrifugal governor and electrical switchgear at the front. The entire drive unit attaches to the side of the machine with just 2 screws and a couple of connecting links. The interchangeable rear section of the machine contains the complementary accumulators and the bi-directional tens-carry mechanism.


Burroughs Portable, wide carriage Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N A 317254
10 columns, add/subtract, electric, wide carriage, Sterling currency
Dimensions: Body 230W x 340D x 200H, overall 430W x 410D x 260H
Weight: 15.0kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Company, Detroit, 1930s-40s

A ten-column Burroughs Portable from the late 1930s, with direct subtraction, electric motor drive, and a wide paper carriage. The carriage can be positioned manually to adjustable tab stops, and can be used with rolls, sheets, or printed forms. Machines such as this formed the beginning of a long and successful line of bookkeeping and accounting machines which eventually led Burroughs into the computer business.


 

Burroughs Portable, c.1947 Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N P 16753 S
10 columns, add/subtract, electric, Sterling currency
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 230H
Weight: 13.26kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, c.1947

The Portable was "modernised" in the late 1940s with square plastic keytops and a clip-on one-piece cover over the type bars and ribbon spools. The case reverted to the original flat-sided version with a dark brown textured finish. There is a cast-metal "Burroughs" badge on the front, and the new "circle-B" logo (which was adopted in 1947) on the ribbon cover. The very solid and formal appearance was well suited to Burroughs' traditional banking customers.

The machine illustrated is a motor-driven 10-column adder and subtractor for Sterling currency (without Farthings). This machine was assembled in 1947 from US-made parts at the new Burroughs factory at Strathleven in Scotland.


 

Burroughs Portable, c.1955 Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N P 76341 S
8 columns, add/subtract, manual, Sterling currency
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 230H
Weight: 9.83kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, 1950s

As the Portable's market expanded in the post-war years, the colour scheme gradually changed from stuffy dark brown to lighter greys and even pastel colours, with a much less formal script badge on the front panel. The machine illustrated is manually-operated 8-column adder and subtractor finished in a pale grey-green, with keys in mid-grey, cream, and black.


 

Burroughs Portable, c.1955 Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N P 135550 S
10 columns, add/subtract, manual, decimal currency
Dimensions: 230W x 340D x 230H
Weight: 10.1kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Adding Machine Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, 1950s

A 10-column manual adder and subtractor for decimal currency. This machine is finished in a light grey-brown, with grey and white keys. It is not known whether this machine was factory-built for decimal currency or (more probably) converted by Buroughs at the time of Australia's decimal conversion in 1966.


 

Burroughs Portable, green plastic. Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N P 377642 S
8 columns, add only, manual, decimal currency
Dimensions: 260W x 360D x 230H
Weight: 8.53kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Machines Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, 1960s

A late-model add-only machine for decimal currency, which looks positively jolly in its coloured plastic casing. The mechanism is basically identical to the 1930s Class 8 machines above.


 

Burroughs Portable, light brown plastic. Burroughs Portable Adding Machine, S/N P 429403 S
7 columns, add only, manual, decimal currency
Dimensions: 260W x 360D x 230H
Weight: 8.41kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Machines Ltd, Strathleven, Scotland, 1960s

This manually-operated add-only machine would originally have been mounted on a cash drawer in a retail store. The machine has six decimal columns with the keytops numbered in cash-register fashion. The symbol keys in the leftmost column print leters A to E, H, CH, RA, and PO. A channel to the left of the keyboard holds a paper strip to provide a legend for the symbols. A linkage through the right-hand rear of the base unlocks the cash drawer when the machine is operated.


 

The Burroughs Ten-key Adding and Listing Machines

The "J" series of ten-key adding and listing machines was first introduced in 1954, but did not sell in any quantity in Australia until the decimal currency conversion in 1966.

The mechanism is based on a conventional pin carriage and sliding racks, and is powered by a universal (brush-type) motor. The machines found in Australia were manufactured by the Burroughs factories in France and Brazil.


Burroughs J524 (8kb) Burroughs Ten-key, Model J524, S/N J 240929 F
10/11 columns, electric
Dimensions: 210W x 350D x 170H
Weight: 7.46kg
Manufactured: Burroughs S.A., Paris, France, 1960s

The J524 illustrated is a basic machine with add, subtract, total, and sub-total keys on the right of the keyboard. On the left is an "Error" or keyboard clearing key, a non-add key, and a "repeat" key marked with an X for use in multiplication.


Burroughs J624 (8kb) Burroughs Ten-key, Model J624, S/N J 236370 F
10/11 columns, electric
Dimensions: 220W x 340D x 180H
Weight: 8.0kg
Manufactured: Burroughs S.A., Paris, France, 1960s

The J624 is similar to the machine above, with the addition of a second repeat key to enable repeated subtraction.


 

Burroughs J700 (8kb) Burroughs Ten-key, Model J700, S/N J 430935 F
10/11 columns, electric
Dimensions: 240W x 350D x 180H
Weight: 8.41kg
Manufactured: Burroughs S.A., Paris, France, 1965-

The J700 from 1965 is generally similar to the J624, but incorporates a semi-automatic multiplier mechanism. The operator selects positive or negative multiplication on the repeat keys (now labelled R and R-), and then presses one of the red multiplier keys to perform the required number of additions or subtractions. When all digits have been processed a total is taken to print the result.

The internal mechanism is also similar to the previous model, but with the casing an inch wider to accommodate the additional keys on the left-hand side.


Burroughs J1522 Burroughs Ten-key, 1000 Series, Model J1522, S/N J 357833 021
8/9 columns, electric
Dimensions: 210W x 350D x 170H
Weight: 7.57kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Eletronica LTDA, Brazil, 1960s

This "1000 Series" J1522 is similar to the J524 above, but with only 8 places in the keyboard register and 9 in the accumulator. The "Burroughs Electronics" nameplate confirms that Burroughs were active in other areas of electronics in the 1960s, although this adding machine was still entirely mechanical.


Burroughs J1624 (8kb) Burroughs Ten-key, 1000 Series, Model J1624, S/N J 239775 021
10/11 columns, electric
Dimensions: 240W x 350D x 180H
Weight: 7.85kg
Manufactured: Burroughs Eletronica LTDA, Brazil, 1960s

This 1000 Series J1624 is a later version of the J624 (above), in a larger and more angular case. This machine was also built by the Burroughs Electronics factory in Brazil.



The Burroughs Electronic Calculator

Burroughs C5155 Burroughs C5000 Series, Model C5155, S/N C-164938-024
Functions: ASMD, constant
Technology: MOS-LSI (AMI, 3 chips)
Display: 10 digits, 7-segment neon (Panaplex II)
Dimensions: 200W x 285D x 100H
Weight: 2.33kg
Manufactured: S.A.Burroughs, France, 1973


This Burroughs C5155 is a basic four-function electronic calculator, built by Burroughs in France in 1973. The circuitry uses MOS-LSI technology in three 40-pin chips from AMI, plus a host of supporting components.
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Original text and images Copyright © John Wolff 2002-16.
Last Updated: 20 January 2016

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